Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

03

Jan

Across history and around the world, art has been used to commemorate historical events and triumphs. So, why should our modern achievements be any different?
Behold how this mix of oil and canvas beautifully encapsulates and memorializes a moment that truly captured our nation’s attention. The moment one brave, fantastically dressed monkey walked into an IKEA. Powerful stuff.
laurenkaelin:


Ikea Monkey, 2013
BENJAMEME .001
Oil on velum 

Across history and around the world, art has been used to commemorate historical events and triumphs. So, why should our modern achievements be any different?

Behold how this mix of oil and canvas beautifully encapsulates and memorializes a moment that truly captured our nation’s attention. The moment one brave, fantastically dressed monkey walked into an IKEA. Powerful stuff.

laurenkaelin:

Ikea Monkey, 2013

BENJAMEME .001

Oil on velum 

(Source: laurenkaelin)

"Good Morning, Sunshine and Happy New Year! It’s 2013, isn’t it just marvelous? A new dawn is upon us, a time for auspicious new beginnings!""I just threw up all those tequila shots and some cheese fries.""Yes, out with the old in with new! That’s the spirit!"Horace and Lydia, John Collier

"Good Morning, Sunshine and Happy New Year! It’s 2013, isn’t it just marvelous? A new dawn is upon us, a time for auspicious new beginnings!"

"I just threw up all those tequila shots and some cheese fries."

"Yes, out with the old in with new! That’s the spirit!"


Horace and Lydia, John Collier

Le Peanut Gallery is back in action! 
Take a leaf from this gentleman’s book and try not to get too excited.

John Collier, The Garden Party

Le Peanut Gallery is back in action!

Take a leaf from this gentleman’s book and try not to get too excited.

John Collier, The Garden Party

24

Oct

"I cannot take this silent treatment any longer, Edouard! I am not made of stone!"

"Really? That’s what you go with? MADE OF STONE!? You are SO insensitive! You’re dead to me!"
"Oh, here we go with the vampire jokes. I knew this would never bloody well work out."


The Vampire, Charles Negre, 1853

"I cannot take this silent treatment any longer, Edouard! I am not made of stone!"


"Really? That’s what you go with? MADE OF STONE!? You are SO insensitive! You’re dead to me!"


"Oh, here we go with the vampire jokes. I knew this would never bloody well work out."



The Vampire, Charles Negre, 1853

Row, row, row your ghost ship, gently down the stream
Creepily, creepily, creepily, life is but a scream.

The Hour of the Ghost, Joaquim Pla Janini, Undated

Row, row, row your ghost ship, gently down the stream

Creepily, creepily, creepily, life is but a scream.

The Hour of the Ghost, Joaquim Pla Janini, Undated

10

Oct

As today is Watteau’s birthday, I thought it only fitting to feature one of his works on Le Peanut Gallery today.
The central figure in this piece represents Mezzetino, a stock character in Italian Commedia dell’Arte.  His name translates to “a half measure of liquor”, and you can bet that this guy was definitely at least half empty when it came to his moral code. Though he can sing and dance quite well, he is a schemer and a bit of a scoundrel, especially when the bella donnas are concerned.
In one story, he attempts to mack on a lady by bragging how in six years of marriage, he and his wifey never, ever fought. Not once! Oh, except for that one time when she wouldn’t let him sneeze. But that was the last time they ever fought, mind you, because then he promptly murdered her. A happy marriage indeed.
When his tale of mariticide doesn’t get the lady’s heart a flutter, she points out that she is already married. “So am I,” responds the creepy Casanova, “but that’s nothing five sous of rat poison can’t fix!”
Charming, isn’t he?Mezzetin, Antoine Watteau, 1718

As today is Watteau’s birthday, I thought it only fitting to feature one of his works on Le Peanut Gallery today.


The central figure in this piece represents Mezzetino, a stock character in Italian Commedia dell’Arte.  His name translates to “a half measure of liquor”, and you can bet that this guy was definitely at least half empty when it came to his moral code. Though he can sing and dance quite well, he is a schemer and a bit of a scoundrel, especially when the bella donnas are concerned.


In one story, he attempts to mack on a lady by bragging how in six years of marriage, he and his wifey never, ever fought. Not once! Oh, except for that one time when she wouldn’t let him sneeze. But that was the last time they ever fought, mind you, because then he promptly murdered her. A happy marriage indeed.


When his tale of mariticide doesn’t get the lady’s heart a flutter, she points out that she is already married. “So am I,” responds the creepy Casanova, “but that’s nothing five sous of rat poison can’t fix!”


Charming, isn’t he?

Mezzetin, Antoine Watteau, 1718

28

Sep

As shown in the above image, squirrels were popular pets in England in the 1500s.
Do you know what else was popular in England in the 1500s?
Rampant disease and fleas.
Just saying.

A Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling, Hans Holbein the Younger ,1526-8

As shown in the above image, squirrels were popular pets in England in the 1500s.

Do you know what else was popular in England in the 1500s?

Rampant disease and fleas.

Just saying.


A Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling, Hans Holbein the Younger ,1526-8

25

Sep

Don’t be fooled, this lovely lady is not trying out Peeta’s Hunger Games camouflage technique, she is dead as doornail.
For here we have not Katniss Everdeen, but Ophelia from Shakespear’s Hamlet.
Super bummed about the fact that her boyfriend killed her dad, she drowns herself in a stream. Boo hoo.
However, lady must have read Language of Flowers before she went off the deep end (drowning joke!) because the flowers she clutches in her cold dead hands  all have symbolic meanings.
Daisies represent innocence, pansies love in vain and poppies represent death. Ok, so the poppies may have been touch redundant, because why say it with flowers when you can say it with your own corpse? 
Ophelia, Sir John Everett Millais, 1851

Don’t be fooled, this lovely lady is not trying out Peeta’s Hunger Games camouflage technique, she is dead as doornail.

For here we have not Katniss Everdeen, but Ophelia from Shakespear’s Hamlet.

Super bummed about the fact that her boyfriend killed her dad, she drowns herself in a stream. Boo hoo.

However, lady must have read Language of Flowers before she went off the deep end (drowning joke!) because the flowers she clutches in her cold dead hands  all have symbolic meanings.

Daisies represent innocence, pansies love in vain and poppies represent death. Ok, so the poppies may have been touch redundant, because why say it with flowers when you can say it with your own corpse? 

Ophelia, Sir John Everett Millais, 1851

14

Sep

cuddlesandrage:

Peanut Gallery

cuddlesandrage:

Peanut Gallery

30

Aug

Monet was strolling around the countryside with his step-daughter, Blanche, and saw some haystacks in a field. He thought they were super cool and asked Blanche to fetch him two canvases so he could start painting them right away. One canvas was to capture  the light on the haystacks in sunny weather and one for the light in not-so-sunny weather.
But lo and behold, there were lots of in between kinds of light in the day and two canvases were not enough. Poor Blanche ended up bringing wheelbarrow upon wheelbarrow of canvases out into the field for her good ol’ step-papa. He painted the haystacks in the fog, in the snow, in the sun, in the rain, on a train, with a fox wearing sox, you get the idea.
In the end, Monet painted 25 different haystack paintings, capturing the light in different times of the day and year.
Blanche grew weary of carting out canvases, and decided to take matters into her own hands. One day, she brought a rifle and shot each haystack to death. But as they were haystacks, they didn’t feel a thing. The End.
Stacks of Wheat (End of Summer), Claude Monet, 1897

Monet was strolling around the countryside with his step-daughter, Blanche, and saw some haystacks in a field. He thought they were super cool and asked Blanche to fetch him two canvases so he could start painting them right away. One canvas was to capture  the light on the haystacks in sunny weather and one for the light in not-so-sunny weather.

But lo and behold, there were lots of in between kinds of light in the day and two canvases were not enough. Poor Blanche ended up bringing wheelbarrow upon wheelbarrow of canvases out into the field for her good ol’ step-papa. He painted the haystacks in the fog, in the snow, in the sun, in the rain, on a train, with a fox wearing sox, you get the idea.

In the end, Monet painted 25 different haystack paintings, capturing the light in different times of the day and year.

Blanche grew weary of carting out canvases, and decided to take matters into her own hands. One day, she brought a rifle and shot each haystack to death. But as they were haystacks, they didn’t feel a thing. The End.

Stacks of Wheat (End of Summer), Claude Monet, 1897